Health Screenings Provide Health and Financial Benefits to Businesses

Corporate health screenings are a growing trend for companies seeking ways to reduce expenditures and provide a better quality of health for employees. By encouraging and maintaining the wellness of workers, the possibility of preventing potential health problems increases, which can result in lowering medicals costs associated with treating a condition in its advanced stage. Implementing preventive health care programs that include regular health screenings, immunizations and education is the first line of defense against health problems and rising health expenditures for businesses.

Chronic illnesses and health conditions can decrease employee productivity and increase absenteeism and presenteeism, which greatly impacts a company’s bottom line. In fact, The Human Resources Policy Association puts the annual cost of reduced productivity for businesses between $87 and $127 billion. Diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, high cholesterol and complications from obesity are listed by The Center for Disease Control as illnesses most commonly uncovered during health screenings. If undetected and left untreated, problems resulting from these conditions can disrupt every aspect of an employee’s life, including productivity in the workplace.

“Preventive health care is an efficient and effective method of identifying and treating possible health conditions before they have the opportunity to develop or worsen,” says Dr. Jeffrey Greiff, founder of Flu Busters, a third-party provider of on-site preventive health care for businesses. “When a potential health condition is diagnosed in its early stages, it can be easily remedied and can prevent more serious conditions, resulting in a much healthier patient over time.”

An Employer Health Benefits Survey found from 2002 to 2007, health insurance premiums for businesses increased approximately five times faster than inflation and four times faster than wage growth. As health insurance premiums continue to increase throughout the 2008 – 2009 fiscal year, analysts believe health care costs are a threat to the financial success of American businesses. Businesses are discovering the economic benefits of preventing and identifying employee health problems before they become serious ailments by offering annual on-site health screenings that improve and protect employees’ current and future state of health.

A common deterrent for employees against receiving health screenings and immunization by a primary care physician is that the medical services can interrupt an employee’s busy day resulting in wasted time and energy. Third-party health care providers are gaining popularity in the business world due to their ability to provide on-site services to companies of any size. So, how does it work?

Health screenings are available to companies of all sizes and can be provided on-site by a team of experienced health professionals. Prior to a health screening, information sheets are provided to make recommendations on what screenings would be most beneficial for an employee based on individual circumstances, such as, age, sex and family history. The actual screening takes only minutes and employees receive most screening results within minutes of the actual screening. A post-screening consultation with a registered health professional, as well as an online customized wellness program is offered to address any existing or potential health issues that may have been uncovered in the screening. From the initial screening to the post-screening consultation phase, the screening participants are actively assisted in developing solutions that will enable them to lead healthier, more productive and fulfilling lives.

Even through economic hardships, businesses can still provide employees with quality health care by focusing on prevention. Routine health screenings and immunizations can identify and prevent illnesses, resulting in healthier employees, lower insurance premiums, increased productivity and decreased absenteeism. Businesses that establish a comprehensive wellness plan are investing in their employees, and ultimately, the company’s success.

The Top 10 Mistakes You Can Make to Ensure You Fail in Your Network Marketing Business

This article uses a tongue in cheek approach to point out mistakes that people make in the direct selling industry every day that is detrimental to the success of their own business. Below are ten common mistakes made by people who decide they want to own their own direct selling business and they are not listed in any specific order of importance either.

1. Lie and disrespect everyone around you (Honesty and respect).

If my lips are moving, I’m lying. This product cures every disease on the planet and on Mars. Trust me.

Truth in “who” you are and “what” you do is the foundation of the direct selling industry. You become a personal brand and represent a company, and organization, and a product line. By lying and treating people poorly casts a shadow over you, your company and the industry and people will judge everyone else they come in contact with in this industry with disdain.

You have to be the shining light for all to see that this industry is a legitimate business. People will join you and work with you instead of running the other way. Your reputation and the company’s reputation must pass the TEST so that your business grows.

2. Do not Market your products.

Now that I won my own business people will flock to me and hand me all their money and I don’t even have to get up off my lazy boy chair.

Marketing, meeting with people, or telling others about your business is the only way people know you exist. You have to get the word out about what you do and what you offer. If you choose not to do this portion of your business then you are doomed. You are just as doomed if by chance you don’t know how and are unwilling to learn just the same.

Some key examples of marketing.

  • Prospecting
  • Networking
  • Referrals
  • Word of mouth

3. Closed (do not speak with anyone).

Go away, we’re closed. Come back tomorrow.

Your hours of operation are extremely important. Why would you own a business and not open your shop? How does this apply to me? If you are not speaking to people about your business, then your business is closed. If you are not selling what you offer, then your business is closed. Get the point?

Bottom line is: Closed mouth is a Closed Business. When your mouth is open your business is open.

Word of caution: Do not vomit on everyone about your business. Learn how to work your offerings into conversations without body slamming people right away with your sales pitch. Slapping someone with your pitch before you even know who they are or how you can help them is wrong. You have to build rapport and trust as people buy you before they buy your product or business.

4. Sell for a loss or give away the store- no profits.

Don’t worry I will give you a home boy discount. I will cut you a break and pay for your products myself so you can keep coming back and basking for more.

Undervaluing or devaluing your products is not a smart move. A lot of people will offer their products at wholesale cost or even at a loss in order to attract and keep customers. The problem is that you, more than likely, do not sell enough in volume to make a profit. Businesses that don’t make a profit don’t stay in business very long.

In addition, you tell your customers that your products are overvalued and you don’t believe they are worth the suggested retail cost, and if you don’t value the cost then your customers won’t value the cost either.

5. Do not Re-invest back into your business.

Why should you put money back into your business operation? Answer… Operating Costs.

When you sell your products and you spend the money that’s not a good thing. You should set aside the money so you can buy more products, attend trainings and events, and purchase development materials for your own personal growth. When you manage the money from your sales the right way you should never have to use money from your personal accounts after your initial investment. If by chance you are not doing so, start right now. Set up your business budget with a separate bank account as you do not want to co-mingle your business funds with your personal funds.

6. Hire a ton of people.

I need a personal assistant and a driver now that I’m a big hot shot business owner. I’m CEO of my own company!

When starting out you should have no or few employees to help you in your business. In fact, don’t consider hiring for your business until you hit certain levels of success and you have steady income from your business that supports the decision of having employee support.

One are you might consider outsourcing is your personal chores. Hire neighborhood kids to mow your lawn, or delegate that to your children if they are capable and teach them how to operate their own lawn care business.

7. Don’t pay your bills and taxes.

Pay your bills. Nuff said! Hmmmph!

No joke, make sure you pay your bills and on time so you eliminate late fees. This is an area that will help you reduce and eliminate your personal debt. Focus on building your business so that you can set aside some of the money to help pay those bills. Make sure you counsel with a successful leader in your success line so they can guide you and help you to not mistakes that will in turn hurt your business and slow down your business growth.

Taxes – pay your taxes: Self-employment tax, federal, state, and local. Where applicable pay your sales tax as well.

8. Stop learning (Closed mind).

I don’t need that stuff. I’m the smartest person I know. Just ask me, I’ll tell you I’m right.

You should schedule time daily for personal development. Improving your skills or understanding is a must if you want to lead others. No one wants to follow a dummy. Ignorance is a detriment and can only be cured by you spending time reading books and listening to tapes, cd’s, and web/pod casts. Attending your support organization’s or company’s events is very valuable and important for your growth and the growth of your entire team.

If you are the only one in your organization right now, you won’t be for long. At least that’s the goal of not to be the only one in your organization. You must be able to lead yourself if you are to lead the many. Personal development allows you to relate to as many people as you possibly can. Leaders are readers and help others to see the value in personal development.

9. Don’t schedule your time (I’ll work it when I work it).

Come and go as you please, ignore your family time and play video games all day. Wasting time is a primary enemy for this industry.

As an employee we are accustomed to a time structure we must follow. You are mandated when you are to arrive at work, when to take your breaks and lunches and when the work day ends. By the time we get home, most of us don’t want to follow a schedule unless we want to watch our favorite program on TV.

You must work a calendar into your life. Set aside all the time you cannot work your business. This includes work, church, family, volunteering, and any other time that you cannot absolutely use to dedicate to your own business. Then find the time in your weekly schedule when you can dedicate to working and building your business. Hint: You are going to have to give up some TV and video game time until you are making enough money to where you can buy back time from your job.

10. Break the law; don’t follow your company’s policies or code of conduct.

Who wakes up and says today I’m breaking the law?

Keep in mind that your company may offer products in other countries. Also keep in mind that ignorance of the law of another country is no excuse and do not assume what’s legal in your host country is legal in another country.

Make sure your company has authorization to operate in a specific country before you start selling your goods there. Packaging, compensation, marketing, and distribution are all examples of key areas where laws differ drastically from one country to another, and if your company does not have an official operation in place for a specific country than don’t focus on building your business there.

In addition, make sure you know what you can say versus what you cannot say during conversations and presentations. You cannot make or guarantee income claims or health claims. You cannot diagnose or offer cures for disease or health ailments unless you are a certified medical professional.

In conclusion, evaluate your own business and your mental attitude you have relating to each are discussed and see what changes you can make to improve your likelihood of success. No one can guarantee your success and by following this article as a guideline does not guarantee it either. However, by ignoring the basic fundamentals that allow success you almost guarantee your failure. Who wants to improve their chances of failure?

Coffee and direct selling is a perfect match. You don’t have to educate or teach people about coffee. Healthy coffee is even a better product line. People can keep drinking their coffee and now receive better nutrition. They can enjoy and experience a healthy full flavored organic coffee that has over 150 antioxidants infused into very cup with its herbal ingredients.

Travel Inoculation – Know The Facts Before You Travel

There is nothing like the thrill of exploring and discovering other peoples and cultures as we travel the world. However, there is a serious side to travel. Visiting a foreign country also means that we are exposed to bacterias and viruses that we may otherwise not come into contact with in our own country. This is why travel inoculation is so important. In many cases, it can save our lives.

The subject of travel inoculation causes great amounts of confusion and anxiety in many travelers. The type of travel inoculation required will greatly depend on the time of the year that you will be traveling and the geography of the destination that you will be traveling to (e.g. rural, urban or forested areas). Nevertheless, it’s extremely important to be aware of what can be contracted in different parts of the world.

Cholera can be caught from contaminated food, particularly shellfish and water. Symptoms include severe diahrrea and vomiting. Cholera immunisation is no longer necessary for international travelers. However immunisation against Cholera for aid workers staying for long periods in known high risk areas, or those who have an underlying gastro-intestinal condition, is highly recommended. Countries: African, Indian, Far East, Central and South American subcontinents, and parts of Eastern Europe

Hepatitis A can be contracted through contaminated food, water and personal contact. It is associated with poor hygiene and sanitation. Symptoms include severe vomiting and diarrhea. Travel inoculation of combined Hepatitis A and B, or Hepatitis A and Typhoid, should be given 2 weeks prior to departure. Countries: African, Indian, Far East, Central and South American subcontinents, and parts of Eastern Europe

Hepatitis B is a viral infection of the liver which can be fatal. This disease can be contracted through contact with infected blood (e.g. in drug transfusion), bodily fluids (e.g. in sexual intercourse), blood-to-blood contact (e.g. sharing of contaminated needles), or by a human bite from an infected person. Hepatitis B is easier to catch than HIV as it is more concentrated in the infected person’s bloodstream and can exist on surfaces outside the body. Travel inoculation is administered in 3 doses, the second dose administered one month after the first, and the third dose administered five months later. Once a blood test proves your immunity, you will be protected for life. A combined Hepatitis A and B inoculation is available. Countries: Sub-Saharan Africa, most of Asia and the Pacific Islands, the Amazon:

Japanese Encephalitis is a disease that is passed on to humans through bites from infected mosquitos normally in tropical surroundings. The symptoms are mild, although in severe cases, the disease can cause brain inflammation. Travel inoculation should be administered one month prior to travel in 3 doses. Countries: Far East, South-East Asia, tropical North-East Australia

Malaria is a tropical disease that is passed on to humans by mosquitos carrying this virus. Symptoms appear 10 days to 4 weeks after infection and include fever, chills, flu-like symptoms of muscular aches and headaches, diarrhea and nausea. A course of anti-malarial tablets must be started up to 3 weeks prior to departure, should continue to be taken abroad, and taken for a further 4 weeks after return. Extra precautions such as mosquito nets and insect repellants must be used as the tablets are not 100% effective. Countries: Africa, South and Central America, Asia and Middle East

Typhoid fever is the result of a bacteria contracted from contaminated food, water and person to person contact in areas where hygiene is poor. Causing fever, diarrhoea, and serious illness, Typhoid can be fatal. The inoculation should be administered one month prior to departure. However, care should still be taken with food (e.g. do not eat fruit unless you have pealed it yourself), water(e.g. drinking only bottled water with seal intact) and personal hygiene as the travel inoculation is not 100% effective. A combined Typhoid and Hepatitis A vaccine is available. Countries: Africa, South and Central America, Asia and Middle East

Yellow fever is a serious viral disease that is found only in tropical South America and sub-Saharan Africa and is also spread by mosquito bites. Symptoms include headache, vomiting, jaundice and bleeding. This disease can be fatal, and some countries, particularly East Africa, require a certificate of vaccination prior to entry. The travel inoculation should be administered 10 days prior to departure date and lasts for 10 years. Countries: Africa, South and Central America, Asia and Middle East

Meningococcal Meningitis is a bacterial form of meningitis that affects the brain membrane. This infection can be spread by direct close contact with nose and throat discharge (e.g. through sneezing) of an infected person. Symptoms include high fevers, severe headaches, discomfort when looking at bright lights, purple bruising, vomiting and sometimes chills or fever. There are 3 strains of the disease that are not covered in the common preventative immunisations commonly vaccinated for in the UK, USA, Australia and New Zealand. These uncommon strains, A, W, and Y, can be found in Sub-Saharan Africa, Northern India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan and Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia requires vaccination of pilgrims to Mecca during the Hajj. Travel Inoculation should be administered 3 weeks prior to trip. Countries: Sub-Saharan Africa, Northern India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Saudi Arabia

Poliomyelitis (Polio) is caused by a virus that can be contracted from contaminated food and water and person to person contact. Particularly common in Indian subcontinents and sub-Saharan Africa, those infected are often unaware of that they have the disease. In severe cases, it can cause paralysis and difficulty in breathing. Polio is immunised against in countries like the UK, USA, Australia and New Zealand. However, as a preventative measure, check with your doctor prior to your trip for a booster dose. Countries: Indian subcontinents and sub-Saharan Africa

Tick-borne encephalitis is a disease that is passed on to humans from bites of infected ticks (e.g. while hiking or camping in Spring or Summer). This disease causes brain inflammation, and can at times even be contracted through unpasteurised milk. The symptoms are flu-like. Short term travel incoculation against this disease is available from your doctor. Countries: Heavily forested areas of Western and Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, Russia, parts of China

Rabies is a virus that is spread by the bite of an infected animal, most commonly a dog, and it commonly fatal. A dog with rabies can be recognised by foaming or drooling from the mouth and highly aggressive behaviour. Symptoms include extreme thirst, spasms, fear of water and paralysis. Doctors recommend preventative travel inoculation against this disease when traveling to areas where medical attention may not be readily available. Countries: All regions of the world where medical attention not available.

All travelers should assess their own risk by considering the nature of their travel, and while travel inoculations work, travelers must never assume that they are 100% effective all the time. That is why every health and hygiene precaution must still be taken in preventing the illness. A successful trip depends equally on the preparation we make ahead of the trip and the precautions that we take while we are on our journey.